E-learning design overview

E-learning design: Let the design speak for itself

The production of e-learning starts with the conceptualization and the right choice of tools. In the project phase of creation two main types of design are then in focus in the area of e-learning design: the instructional design and graphic design.

While instructional design describes the process of transforming content into understandable and engaging learning materials, graphic design focuses on making the content appealing. It's not just about making something "look nice", but rather how the design influences the success of the e-learning. A successful design is crucial for the learner's first impression and can increase both their motivation and their understanding of the learning content. learning content increase. Ideally, it even conveys messages and makes it easier to remember the content learned.

If you are looking for the right design for your e-learning, you should first consider who your target group and which visual elements and effects are relevant. Once you have decided on a style, make sure that the design language is applied consistently.

Overview of different styles of e-learning design

There are numerous design styles that you can use and even combine. Below you will find a selection of basic graphic design styles:

1. minimalism

Minimalism is characterized by simplicity in the use of color, typography and composition and aims to convey content with clarity and efficiency. This style offers a clear and appealing aesthetic, improved usability and a focus on the essentials.

Features:

  • Reduced, neutral or pastel color palette
  • Lots of white or negative space
  • thin lines
  • Clear visual hierarchy
  • Simple shapes
  • clear typography


Examples:

2. flat design

This style could be described as a sub-category of minimalism. It is characterized by a two-dimensional appearance and avoids all design elements that create a 3D effect, such as drop shadows, bevels and textures. It is easily scalable, user-friendly and modern. Flat design has developed as a counter-current to skeuomorphism, a style that attempts to reproduce objects as realistically as possible. Flat design is particularly suitable for mobile user interfaces. Google, for example, introduced a similar style, Material Design, in 2014.

Features:

  • two-dimensional graphics
  • No realistic shading
  • no details
  • Function before form
  • Vibrant and bright colors
  • little/no color gradients
  • clear typography
  • good for logos, icons and infographics


Examples:

3. 3D

Unlike flat design, this style uses three-dimensional models and effects to create the illusion of depth and realism.

Features:

  • Use of shadows
  • Lighting and perspective
  • realistic textures
  • spatial depth


Examples:

4. isometry

Isometrics is a special form of 3D design in which three-dimensional objects are represented in a two-dimensional plane, creating the perception of spatial depth. This style combines the advantages of 3D with simpler design and greater visibility of detail.

Features:

  • Regular angles
  • Uniform perspective
  • No real spatial depth


Examples:

5. retro / vintage

This design style is inspired by past eras and uses elements and styles from the 1920s to the 1990s. It creates a unique and nostalgic aesthetic, evokes emotions in the right target group and offers creative freedom.

Features:

  • Vintage colors and textures
  • retro typography
  • Outdated graphics and style elements


Examples:

6. abstract / geometry

This style uses geometric shapes, patterns and abstract elements to create visual interest. It allows creative freedom, offers a variety of interpretations and can convey a modern aesthetic.

Features:

  • geometric shapes
  • abstract patterns
  • High-contrast colors
  • Reduced depth of detail


Examples:

7. cartoon / comic

This style is inspired by comics and cartoons and uses simplified, exaggerated and sometimes humorous illustrations. It creates a playful and entertaining aesthetic, enables clear visual communication and is appealing to different target groups.

Features:

  • exaggerated proportions
  • Clear lines
  • Vibrant colors
  • humorous depictions


Examples:

8. lineart

This style uses only lines to depict shapes, contours and textures. Lineart is usually drawn in black and white. The advantages are clear and simple representations, good scalability and the possibility for creative experiments.

Features:

  • Lines only
  • no color or shading in the narrower sense
  • Clear contours and shapes


Examples:

9th collage

This style combines different images, textures and graphics to create a compositional unity. The combination of illustration and photography can create unique, appealing designs with a playful touch that can captivate the viewer and tell visual stories.

Features:

  • Various images and textures
  • Overlays
  • textured surfaces
  • unconventional compositions


Examples:

10. photorealism

This style strives to make images or graphics look as realistic as possible, often through detailed rendering and high texture resolution. It creates a convincing and immersive visual experience and is well suited for product presentations or architectural visualizations.

Features:

  • High level of detail
  • realistic textures
  • Lifelike lighting and shadows


Examples: